Author

Personal Branding: Where Creativity Meets Entrepreneurship

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By Danny Avershal, Content Creator at Ink Wordsmiths

If you’re an aspiring author, chances are you’re willing to go above and beyond traditional sales methods to get your book read. The internet has changed the way content creators interact with their fans, mostly by means of social media. Gone are the days when a publisher would shell out the better part of their PR budget to promote an author. Publishers now look to the author to complete his or her branding since everyone has the ability to create an internet platform.

To purists who view their writing as more art and less commodity, there is room for both in your life. Branding is something everyone must do, even if it’s minimal. Just because you have the desire to build an audience and sell books, it doesn’t mean you’re not an artist. In fact, positioning yourself as a marketable writer people recognize through your work is an art form in itself.

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Consider Stephen King. He’s one of the most famous authors of all time with an incredible array of novels, yet when you’re reading his work, you know it’s Stephen King because of his specific style and brand aesthetic. King decided at a certain point in his career he would sacrifice some time and energy branding to facilitate opportunities for future books to be sold. He’s still an artist. Yet, he’s also a best-selling brand.

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With InstaFreebie, you can release your book on the internet to a wider audience. Such reach can create a deeper connection with your existing fans as you cultivate a broader following, gaining future customers for upcoming projects. You’ll start to see that mailing list grow, as well as interest in you as an author, when you begin to build a personal writing brand.

Taking your book to the internet rather than utilizing a conventional marketing strategy can be intimidating at first. However, think of it as an investment in future sales of books you have yet to write. Ultimately, what you sacrifice in direct sales has the potential to pay off in the form of greater readership down the line. Before, people might have only found your book through the bookstore or a google search, whereas using InstaFreebie potential audiences can search social media platforms, as well as online recommendation engines to find your book. In short, you’re giving up a little profit at the outset so you can sell more books to more future readers. InstaFreebie is simply a means of bringing literary consumption to the 21st century.

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Struggling with your manuscript? Contact Ink Wordsmiths for writing, editing, branding. and ghostwriting support today. We can assist you in taking your writing and author platform to the next level. Write to us @ hello@inkwordsmiths.com

 

5 Tips for Writing Your First Book

This blog is part of a series of helpful pointers for fellow writers in the “The Six-Figure Writer” Community

I get this question a lot: “Is it hard to write a book?” It depends on what you wish to write. Writing a novel, especially a fantasy epic involving new worlds and a rich backstory, can be challenging. Writing a non-fiction book on the other hand, may require less conceptual imagining but more time-consuming research. The key to not being overwhelmed when penning either is preparation and perseverance. Below, please find some suggestions on how to begin your first book.

1. Always Create an Outline

Take it from someone who made the mistake (more than once) of not creating an outline, you should ALWAYS create one before beginning any writing. The rationale is analogous to building a home. It would be foolish not to draft a blueprint before initiating construction. The same mindset applies to writing a book. Simply “winging it” is a mistake. You want to know exactly where your story is going. The more you map out each chapter, the better prepared you will be to actually start writing.

2. Do the Heavy-Lifting at the Outset

Similar to the preparations involved in outlining, you want to tackle the taxing mental work upfront. I suggest front-loading each project with all the difficult aspects. The more prepared you are, the more you know your material, the better off you will be down the road. You want to make all the significant content choices as early as possible in the process so you don’t end up painting yourself into a corner later by not thinking things through first.

3. Leave Room for Innovation

The flip-side to suggestions #1 and 2. Know your book’s through-line or trajectory but don’t get (unnecessarily) bogged down in the specific details. Though it’s important to be highly prepared, you want to leave room for spontaneous creative bursts. Build in some room for flexibility.

4. Don’t Give Up

Once you begin writing, don’t take breaks for more than a day or two at a time. Inertia can be a powerful force. Don’t stop writing until you’ve completed your first draft. Even if you think what you’ve typed is not ideal, don’t halt. The most important thing is to get all the ideas out of your head and onto the screen (or paper if you’re oldschool.) You will have plenty of time to revise the material later.

5. Consider a Ghost-Writer or Writing Coach

Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you get stuck. Depending on the ambitions for your project, perhaps bringing in a professional is a good idea. If the purpose of writing a book is to give your business credibility and it’s not your literary opus, then it is okay to acknowledge the fact that it was your idea, but you may need someone else to bring it to fruition.

There are many, many more tips to writing your first book. Please feel free to share yours. For more info and helpful resources, please visit the Six-Figure Writer Page.