Writing

Why Do You Need a Ghostwritten Book?

GHOSTWRITING can seem like a confusing process. However, it is really quite simple and I can explain it this way: go into any Barnes & Noble and scan the shelves. 50% of the book titles you see were not written by the author on the spine. They were ghostwritten by someone else.

Bottom Line

Someone paid another writer to write their book so they could get credit. Amazing, right? Don’t have the time, background, or skills to write a book, but still want to be an author? Hire a writer to do it for you.

For professionals, especially CEO’s, writing a book can significantly increase their business success. Why? A book holds value regardless of the industry you operate in or where you work. Whether you are accountant, business coach, marketer, therapist, public speaker, doctor, lawyer—a book can differentiate yourself from your competition.

Let’s imagine you are a chiropractor. If you search for “chiropractors” in your city, the list of options will seem endless. Thousands of chiropractors are competing for the same business. So how can you differentiate yourself from all those other chiropractors?

By being the only one with your very own book. By being a published author.

A personal book by you is your 21st century business card. Through writing about your specialty, you become more authoritative and influential in your field.

You Become A Thought Leader

Authors are subject experts. Anyone can say they are the best at what they can do, but you can show this to the world by being a published author.

Having a book also provides you with quality content in perpetuity. The next time you have to post something on your Facebook wall, write a LinkedIn piece, or tweet, simply reference your own material.

Why quote someone else and give them the credit? After publishing, you will forever have content. All this content shows up in search engines, distinguishing you from your competition. Instead of looking for customers, now your customers will look for you.

It doesn’t stop there. Need a reason to give a speech, get invited to a radio show, podcast, or TV show? No problem. You can go on any of these to talk about your very own book.

We Live In Interesting Times

Consumers, especially millennials, don’t consult the Yellow Pages when looking for a specific product/service anymore. People use Google to search for what they need.

But when you have written a book—when your name pops up, when it is considered quality, shared content—you bust out of the pack. Now your content appears at the top of the search page.

Authors Make More Money

Published authors can charge more for their expertise. Not only can you make money from your book sales, you can succeed as a consultant. As a perceived expert, people will feel intrigued to know more about you and your thoughts. 

Is Ghostwriting Ethical?

Yes. The most important elements in writing a book are the ideas, not the execution. Most professional writers know creative projects can involve many un-credited people. For instance, many successful writers depend on editors, critique groups and/or beta readers to help bring their work to fruition. You can think of a ghostwriter as your partner, but ultimately you are the true creator of your book.

How Does It Work?

Ghostwriters, like the ones at Ink Wordsmiths, have a simple process: you supply us with the raw data and information, then collaborate with us either in person or remotely.

You may be asking, “But how do you write like me? How do you know my industry so well?”

Our team of writers have worked in a variety of industries, from finance, construction, insurance, health care, technology, politics, economics, and entertainment. We have written Amazon Best Sellers, business books, memoirs, histories, technical books, and even science fiction and fantasy novels. We specialize in research and want to get to know you and your brand as well as you know it.

Once potential leads have the opportunity to know your story, they will become your trusting customers, spreading positive testimonials about your services.

If you’re interested in becoming a thought leader in your field and publishing a book, Ink Wordsmiths is here to help. We specialize in telling stories andwant to tell yours.

Go to www.inkwordsmiths.com for more details on our services, or say hi at hello@inkwordsmiths.com

5 Tips for Writing Your First Book

This blog is part of a series of helpful pointers for fellow writers in the “The Six-Figure Writer” Community

I get this question a lot: “Is it hard to write a book?” It depends on what you wish to write. Writing a novel, especially a fantasy epic involving new worlds and a rich backstory, can be challenging. Writing a non-fiction book on the other hand, may require less conceptual imagining but more time-consuming research. The key to not being overwhelmed when penning either is preparation and perseverance. Below, please find some suggestions on how to begin your first book.

1. Always Create an Outline

Take it from someone who made the mistake (more than once) of not creating an outline, you should ALWAYS create one before beginning any writing. The rationale is analogous to building a home. It would be foolish not to draft a blueprint before initiating construction. The same mindset applies to writing a book. Simply “winging it” is a mistake. You want to know exactly where your story is going. The more you map out each chapter, the better prepared you will be to actually start writing.

2. Do the Heavy-Lifting at the Outset

Similar to the preparations involved in outlining, you want to tackle the taxing mental work upfront. I suggest front-loading each project with all the difficult aspects. The more prepared you are, the more you know your material, the better off you will be down the road. You want to make all the significant content choices as early as possible in the process so you don’t end up painting yourself into a corner later by not thinking things through first.

3. Leave Room for Innovation

The flip-side to suggestions #1 and 2. Know your book’s through-line or trajectory but don’t get (unnecessarily) bogged down in the specific details. Though it’s important to be highly prepared, you want to leave room for spontaneous creative bursts. Build in some room for flexibility.

4. Don’t Give Up

Once you begin writing, don’t take breaks for more than a day or two at a time. Inertia can be a powerful force. Don’t stop writing until you’ve completed your first draft. Even if you think what you’ve typed is not ideal, don’t halt. The most important thing is to get all the ideas out of your head and onto the screen (or paper if you’re oldschool.) You will have plenty of time to revise the material later.

5. Consider a Ghost-Writer or Writing Coach

Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you get stuck. Depending on the ambitions for your project, perhaps bringing in a professional is a good idea. If the purpose of writing a book is to give your business credibility and it’s not your literary opus, then it is okay to acknowledge the fact that it was your idea, but you may need someone else to bring it to fruition.

There are many, many more tips to writing your first book. Please feel free to share yours. For more info and helpful resources, please visit the Six-Figure Writer Page.

 

3 Philosophical Concepts To Make You Look Smart

This blog is part of a series of helpful pointers for fellow writers in the “The Six-Figure Writer” Community

As a wordsmith you deal with ideas, not physical objects. A handyman, for instance, needs to know his way around a hammer. If he didn’t, you probably wouldn’t hire him to fix your door.

Likewise, a writer needs to be well-versed in concepts. It would be highly embarrassing to be in a creative meeting and not understand what’s being said. You could even lose a client if you are not well-versed on topics educated people are expected to know. Never fear, fellow writer. This primer explains three fundamental philosophical concepts to help you look smart.

1. Plato's Allegory of the Cave

Imagine a cave where prisoners are forced to work. Since birth, they have all been chained so their arms and legs are immobile. They are forced to look at a wall in front of them. Behind the prisoners is a fire. The fire casts flickering shadows on the wall. Since the prisoners have never seen the flames, only their shadows, they assume the shadows to be real. They have no concept of the greater reality: that the fire exists and that the shadows are merely images.

What Plato is trying to say is that often times, human beings mistake illusions for reality.


How might we escape such limited thinking? In the story, one of the prisoners breaks free from his chains. He looks directly at the fire. It’s so bright, the illumination hurts his eyes. But as his eyes adjust, he comes to recognize reality’s true nature: there are (often unnoticed) primary causes that create our world. This prisoner helps the others to wake up from their delusions too by leading them out of the cave and into the enlightening brightness of the sun.

One of the most insightful attempts to explain the nature of reality, this metaphor is meant to describe the limited mental state of many human beings before reaching enlightenment.

2. Mind/Body Dualism or the Ghost in the Machine Debate

Rene Descartes (famous for saying, “I think, therefore, I am”) theorized that the body and mind were two separate entities. Thoughts exist on a different plane than the physical. Modern scientists disagree. They contend the brain is the physical thing inside controlling everything. The ongoing debates centers on this: how can thoughts (immaterial things) cause material things to occur?

3. Existentialism

Existentialism concerns the search for self and the meaning of life through free will, choice, and personal responsibility. Most people think that existentialism is only about moody intellectuals brooding about alienation, despair, and absurdity. However, this important movement was borne out of the angst of post-war Europe. The unifying idea is that individuals are seeking to discover who they are as they make personal choices. An existentialist believes each person must be responsible for his/her own actions without the need of laws, culture, or traditions.

For more information and helpful resources, please visit the The Six-Figure Writer Page.

You'll Never Guess How Many Words These Authors Type a Day

Daily word count is a daily concern for me. As a writer with my company specializing in written content, it’s my job to be prolific. If I don’t knock enough words every day, I don’t earn a living.

The good news is I have multiple ongoing projects that require my literary services. Not only do I have retainer accounts that pay me every month for content, I have been commissioned to ghost-write several books. Additionally, I am paid to coach other aspiring writers pen their own material. I’m not telling you this information to brag about how much work I’ve got lined up. I mention it to demonstrate the practical reality of a working writer juggling creativity with commerce. Ultimately, my daily output predicts how well I am managing my responsibilities to my clients.

In recent months, I have been averaging 3,000 words a day in order to not fall behind on my work schedule.

An important caveat here: When I say I write 3,000 words a day, this refers to days when I am strictly batching for writing. What does that mean?

Well, as an entrepreneur whose business is dependent on relationships, I must do many other things besides writing. I attend networking events, meet with (potential) clients, and of course, invoice and do all the boring paper work stuff. Therefore, there are “catch up” days when I do not put in 3,000 words. I may write 2,000 words on these days. Then on the days in which I batch writing, I actually write 6,000 to 8,000 words. You see how this averages out?

One more thing- when I mention these numbers, they refer to first draft-writing. The object of this practice is to figuratively vomit all my ideas onto the page so I can edit the material later. For me, the hard part when writing is always the initial draft. That’s why I try to write quickly. The fun part is editing all that goop later.

Okay, so enough about my output. Let’s look at some other authors. The idea behind supplying you these numbers is to help you see where you land on the scale of productivity. And before someone writes in to tell me it’s all about quality, not quantity, let it be known I agree.

But all those soon-to-be quality words have to come from somewhere first.

 Barbara Kingsolver: 1,000

Ernest Hemingway: 500

Jack London: 1,500

Jon Creasey: 6,000

Mark Twain: 1,400

Maya Angelou: 2,500

Norman Mailer: 3,000

R.F. Delderfield: 10,000

Stephen King: 2,000

W. Somerset Maugham: 1,000

This article first appeared on The Six-Figure Writer website. Click here for your copy of the book.

What Happens When You Stop Writing Alone

This blog is part of a series of helpful pointers for fellow writers in the “The Six-Figure Writer” Community

When you think of a WRITER what mental image comes to mind? Is it a person alone hunched over their computer typing away? Emphasis in that last sentence on the word “alone.” The archetype of a writer is an introvert. Popular depictions of writers depict a solitary individual working in isolation. Though that reality may be true for certain writers (at certain times), a strong case may be made that some of the best writing occurs in collaboration. I’d like to give you an example.

Soon after graduating my master screenwriting program, I begin collaborating with Charles D. Borg, a fellow screenwriter from Chapman University. Together, we “beat out” our story ideas, talking over every aspect of a script from theme, to dialogue, to characters. Then we wrote each screenplay together. It was an amazingly beneficial experience for both of us.

Right now, I’d like to go over some reasons why you too should consider partnering up with other writers to achieve greater levels of success.

1. Conceptual Help

Whether dreaming up a screenplay, a fictional book or a non-fictional guide, it doesn’t hurt to have someone you can bounce ideas off of. To me, the most challenging aspect of writing is creating the broad picture or concept that will eventually be captured through an outline. Having another person to discuss and figure out your big idea can be helpful. Together, you can refine and polish your approach until you feel happy with the material.

2. Real-time Responses

Charles and I wrote many comedic TV and Feature scripts together. Unlike other genres, such as drama, comedy is easily measurable based on the visceral human reaction. Essentially, I could tell if something was working if my writing partner laughed aloud. The feedback was instantaneous and helpful. Regardless if you are writing comedy, though, receiving another person’s reaction can save you time. You know right away if you are headed in the right direction or not.

3. Reduced Workload

This may sound obvious but it’s important to recognize. Being able to split the work amongst a collaborator should be one of the prime motivators of writing together. Though some writers are of the mind that it only counts if you are the only person responsible for the material, I beg to differ. There are monetary benefits of sharing the workload. You can produce more content quicker, allowing you to take on more assignments and thus earn more pay.

Author’s note: Charles D. Borg operates his own screenwriting analysis and development company @ http://www.smashtoconsulting.com/. Contact him for outstanding script coverage or to write your screenplay.  

For more information and helpful resources, please visit the The Six-Figure Writer Page.