Entrepreneurship

Personal Branding: Where Creativity Meets Entrepreneurship

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By Danny Avershal, Content Creator at Ink Wordsmiths

If you’re an aspiring author, chances are you’re willing to go above and beyond traditional sales methods to get your book read. The internet has changed the way content creators interact with their fans, mostly by means of social media. Gone are the days when a publisher would shell out the better part of their PR budget to promote an author. Publishers now look to the author to complete his or her branding since everyone has the ability to create an internet platform.

To purists who view their writing as more art and less commodity, there is room for both in your life. Branding is something everyone must do, even if it’s minimal. Just because you have the desire to build an audience and sell books, it doesn’t mean you’re not an artist. In fact, positioning yourself as a marketable writer people recognize through your work is an art form in itself.

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Consider Stephen King. He’s one of the most famous authors of all time with an incredible array of novels, yet when you’re reading his work, you know it’s Stephen King because of his specific style and brand aesthetic. King decided at a certain point in his career he would sacrifice some time and energy branding to facilitate opportunities for future books to be sold. He’s still an artist. Yet, he’s also a best-selling brand.

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With InstaFreebie, you can release your book on the internet to a wider audience. Such reach can create a deeper connection with your existing fans as you cultivate a broader following, gaining future customers for upcoming projects. You’ll start to see that mailing list grow, as well as interest in you as an author, when you begin to build a personal writing brand.

Taking your book to the internet rather than utilizing a conventional marketing strategy can be intimidating at first. However, think of it as an investment in future sales of books you have yet to write. Ultimately, what you sacrifice in direct sales has the potential to pay off in the form of greater readership down the line. Before, people might have only found your book through the bookstore or a google search, whereas using InstaFreebie potential audiences can search social media platforms, as well as online recommendation engines to find your book. In short, you’re giving up a little profit at the outset so you can sell more books to more future readers. InstaFreebie is simply a means of bringing literary consumption to the 21st century.

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Struggling with your manuscript? Contact Ink Wordsmiths for writing, editing, branding. and ghostwriting support today. We can assist you in taking your writing and author platform to the next level. Write to us @ hello@inkwordsmiths.com

 

Why Do You Need a Ghostwritten Book?

GHOSTWRITING can seem like a confusing process. However, it is really quite simple and I can explain it this way: go into any Barnes & Noble and scan the shelves. 50% of the book titles you see were not written by the author on the spine. They were ghostwritten by someone else.

Bottom Line

Someone paid another writer to write their book so they could get credit. Amazing, right? Don’t have the time, background, or skills to write a book, but still want to be an author? Hire a writer to do it for you.

For professionals, especially CEO’s, writing a book can significantly increase their business success. Why? A book holds value regardless of the industry you operate in or where you work. Whether you are accountant, business coach, marketer, therapist, public speaker, doctor, lawyer—a book can differentiate yourself from your competition.

Let’s imagine you are a chiropractor. If you search for “chiropractors” in your city, the list of options will seem endless. Thousands of chiropractors are competing for the same business. So how can you differentiate yourself from all those other chiropractors?

By being the only one with your very own book. By being a published author.

A personal book by you is your 21st century business card. Through writing about your specialty, you become more authoritative and influential in your field.

You Become A Thought Leader

Authors are subject experts. Anyone can say they are the best at what they can do, but you can show this to the world by being a published author.

Having a book also provides you with quality content in perpetuity. The next time you have to post something on your Facebook wall, write a LinkedIn piece, or tweet, simply reference your own material.

Why quote someone else and give them the credit? After publishing, you will forever have content. All this content shows up in search engines, distinguishing you from your competition. Instead of looking for customers, now your customers will look for you.

It doesn’t stop there. Need a reason to give a speech, get invited to a radio show, podcast, or TV show? No problem. You can go on any of these to talk about your very own book.

We Live In Interesting Times

Consumers, especially millennials, don’t consult the Yellow Pages when looking for a specific product/service anymore. People use Google to search for what they need.

But when you have written a book—when your name pops up, when it is considered quality, shared content—you bust out of the pack. Now your content appears at the top of the search page.

Authors Make More Money

Published authors can charge more for their expertise. Not only can you make money from your book sales, you can succeed as a consultant. As a perceived expert, people will feel intrigued to know more about you and your thoughts. 

Is Ghostwriting Ethical?

Yes. The most important elements in writing a book are the ideas, not the execution. Most professional writers know creative projects can involve many un-credited people. For instance, many successful writers depend on editors, critique groups and/or beta readers to help bring their work to fruition. You can think of a ghostwriter as your partner, but ultimately you are the true creator of your book.

How Does It Work?

Ghostwriters, like the ones at Ink Wordsmiths, have a simple process: you supply us with the raw data and information, then collaborate with us either in person or remotely.

You may be asking, “But how do you write like me? How do you know my industry so well?”

Our team of writers have worked in a variety of industries, from finance, construction, insurance, health care, technology, politics, economics, and entertainment. We have written Amazon Best Sellers, business books, memoirs, histories, technical books, and even science fiction and fantasy novels. We specialize in research and want to get to know you and your brand as well as you know it.

Once potential leads have the opportunity to know your story, they will become your trusting customers, spreading positive testimonials about your services.

If you’re interested in becoming a thought leader in your field and publishing a book, Ink Wordsmiths is here to help. We specialize in telling stories andwant to tell yours.

Go to www.inkwordsmiths.com for more details on our services, or say hi at hello@inkwordsmiths.com

How to be Extremely Productive by Doing Nothing

This blog is part of a series of helpful pointers for fellow writers in the “The Six-Figure Writer” Community

We live in a day and age where everything is about productivity. Increase profits, reduce costs, sleep less, work more. There’s a cultural anxiety. We buy books on time management and how to get organized. We live in a perpetually caffeinated state just to create more time in order to be more productive.

For a professional writer, productivity is determined primarily by self-governance and the ability to focus. We measure our productivity in terms of word count and pages written in a day along with the quality of what we write. Rather than live and die by the clock like most professions do, we`re slaves to document size.  

Rather than be told what to do in terms of tasks and duties, like most jobs, we writers must be in a perpetual state of creation. We have to pull words from our imagination and somehow group them together in a way that is engaging and at the very least, coherent.

Therefore, in order to create, we must make the space and time to allow ourselves to do so. As much as we may love the thrill and joy of writing, it does require mental strain to consistently conjure up words. Far too many writers hinder their creativity by not allowing themselves time to decompress. Space for yourself is needed in spite of the urge and panic of “being productive”.

That’s why it’s important you make time every day to be the opposite of productive. To do nothing mentally demanding. This even includes reading, because reading requires your brain to work. In other words, it’s necessary to be lazy.

How much time should you put into this non-activity?

30 minutes a day. 30 minutes is the optimal amount of time for your mind to decompress and recharge. Take a walk, nap, sit and watch mindless TV, browse the Internet. Just do something where your mind is on autopilot.

This seemingly wasteful time will provide two important things to optimize your writing.

1)      Give you a Break

Think of your brain like a muscle. You don`t work the same muscle, day in, day out without taking some kind of break, do you? Your brain needs brain-breaks too in order to function at its top performance level.

2)      Make You More Creative

By giving your brain needed rest, it will help you avoid writer’s fatigue and writer’s block. Practicing non-activity will also help alleviate stress, providing you separation from your work. A relaxed brain generates better quality content. 

Why I Do What I Do

I recently listened to Joe Rogan interview the very talented Dan Auerbach from the Black Keys. Several times in the Podcast, Rogan couldn’t help remarking how tremendous it was to hear someone so passionate about what they do. Auerbach adores making music. It’s in his soul. All day he long he gets to do what he loves. How great is that?

What we’re talking about here is passion. Passion is an incredible thing. Little kids have it when they play. My son has it and he’s a year and half old. How do I know this? Because when he starts playing with his “tet-tet” (his word for a train) nothing can distract him. Time seems to disappear.

Time disappears in a different way for people as they age. The exigencies of life force us to become “serious” and get a job. Jobs don’t engender passion. They’re what we have to do to participate in society. Unfortunately, if we are not careful, our passion can ebb and ebb until we are no longer in the present. We are merely fulfilling obligations. We are bereft of former passions.

I meditate every day. My instructor, Light Watkins, once taught me that after you are done repeating your mantra you should do something constructive to cool down for two minutes. I use my cool down period to say what I am grateful for. I always say to myself that I am grateful to be a writer. People have told me how refreshing it is to see someone so passionate about something that their enthusiasm feels contagious.

So why do I do what I do? Joy.

When I was a little kid, my “tet-tets” were Star Wars Action figures and G.I Joes. I loved story-telling. I used to make up elaborate tales about my toys which I would play out in real-time. That was my passion. As I got older, I planned my life so that I could continue telling stories. Like Auerbach, even if there was no paying attention, I would still do what I love. I would still write.

That’s how you know you’re passionate about something. What are you passionate about?

3 Philosophical Concepts To Make You Look Smart

This blog is part of a series of helpful pointers for fellow writers in the “The Six-Figure Writer” Community

As a wordsmith you deal with ideas, not physical objects. A handyman, for instance, needs to know his way around a hammer. If he didn’t, you probably wouldn’t hire him to fix your door.

Likewise, a writer needs to be well-versed in concepts. It would be highly embarrassing to be in a creative meeting and not understand what’s being said. You could even lose a client if you are not well-versed on topics educated people are expected to know. Never fear, fellow writer. This primer explains three fundamental philosophical concepts to help you look smart.

1. Plato's Allegory of the Cave

Imagine a cave where prisoners are forced to work. Since birth, they have all been chained so their arms and legs are immobile. They are forced to look at a wall in front of them. Behind the prisoners is a fire. The fire casts flickering shadows on the wall. Since the prisoners have never seen the flames, only their shadows, they assume the shadows to be real. They have no concept of the greater reality: that the fire exists and that the shadows are merely images.

What Plato is trying to say is that often times, human beings mistake illusions for reality.


How might we escape such limited thinking? In the story, one of the prisoners breaks free from his chains. He looks directly at the fire. It’s so bright, the illumination hurts his eyes. But as his eyes adjust, he comes to recognize reality’s true nature: there are (often unnoticed) primary causes that create our world. This prisoner helps the others to wake up from their delusions too by leading them out of the cave and into the enlightening brightness of the sun.

One of the most insightful attempts to explain the nature of reality, this metaphor is meant to describe the limited mental state of many human beings before reaching enlightenment.

2. Mind/Body Dualism or the Ghost in the Machine Debate

Rene Descartes (famous for saying, “I think, therefore, I am”) theorized that the body and mind were two separate entities. Thoughts exist on a different plane than the physical. Modern scientists disagree. They contend the brain is the physical thing inside controlling everything. The ongoing debates centers on this: how can thoughts (immaterial things) cause material things to occur?

3. Existentialism

Existentialism concerns the search for self and the meaning of life through free will, choice, and personal responsibility. Most people think that existentialism is only about moody intellectuals brooding about alienation, despair, and absurdity. However, this important movement was borne out of the angst of post-war Europe. The unifying idea is that individuals are seeking to discover who they are as they make personal choices. An existentialist believes each person must be responsible for his/her own actions without the need of laws, culture, or traditions.

For more information and helpful resources, please visit the The Six-Figure Writer Page.

What Happens When You Stop Writing Alone

This blog is part of a series of helpful pointers for fellow writers in the “The Six-Figure Writer” Community

When you think of a WRITER what mental image comes to mind? Is it a person alone hunched over their computer typing away? Emphasis in that last sentence on the word “alone.” The archetype of a writer is an introvert. Popular depictions of writers depict a solitary individual working in isolation. Though that reality may be true for certain writers (at certain times), a strong case may be made that some of the best writing occurs in collaboration. I’d like to give you an example.

Soon after graduating my master screenwriting program, I begin collaborating with Charles D. Borg, a fellow screenwriter from Chapman University. Together, we “beat out” our story ideas, talking over every aspect of a script from theme, to dialogue, to characters. Then we wrote each screenplay together. It was an amazingly beneficial experience for both of us.

Right now, I’d like to go over some reasons why you too should consider partnering up with other writers to achieve greater levels of success.

1. Conceptual Help

Whether dreaming up a screenplay, a fictional book or a non-fictional guide, it doesn’t hurt to have someone you can bounce ideas off of. To me, the most challenging aspect of writing is creating the broad picture or concept that will eventually be captured through an outline. Having another person to discuss and figure out your big idea can be helpful. Together, you can refine and polish your approach until you feel happy with the material.

2. Real-time Responses

Charles and I wrote many comedic TV and Feature scripts together. Unlike other genres, such as drama, comedy is easily measurable based on the visceral human reaction. Essentially, I could tell if something was working if my writing partner laughed aloud. The feedback was instantaneous and helpful. Regardless if you are writing comedy, though, receiving another person’s reaction can save you time. You know right away if you are headed in the right direction or not.

3. Reduced Workload

This may sound obvious but it’s important to recognize. Being able to split the work amongst a collaborator should be one of the prime motivators of writing together. Though some writers are of the mind that it only counts if you are the only person responsible for the material, I beg to differ. There are monetary benefits of sharing the workload. You can produce more content quicker, allowing you to take on more assignments and thus earn more pay.

Author’s note: Charles D. Borg operates his own screenwriting analysis and development company @ http://www.smashtoconsulting.com/. Contact him for outstanding script coverage or to write your screenplay.  

For more information and helpful resources, please visit the The Six-Figure Writer Page.